Saturday, June 23, 2018

"The Lake Log"



The Lake Log
by
Xavier Colfer
(age 13)


January 21, 2018
          I have always loved this lake in the winter. Light from the sun sparkles off the snow, and the ice usually gets pretty thick. I like to use this lake when it is frozen to snowmobile on. It is very wide open, and has a lot of space to roam on. I also use it to get across to my grandmother in the winter. It is quicker to go across than around, and then I can give my grandmother some company in the lonely, cold months.
          Today I was heading across the lake on my snowmobile as usual, when I heard a pop from underneath me. The lake had started to fracture around me! Luckily I put on the speed and got away, but as a warning, always be careful, and pay attention to what's going on!
- Mr. Brook

February 10, 2018
          I am an Olympic skater. Skating is my life, and I love it. It was my mom who instilled the love of skating in me. She had started ice skating when she was young, and she started bringing me to this lake to skate when I was four. Soon I was in love with it. I didn't know then that I would one day go to the Olympics, but I persevered, and tried really hard to get better. I tried to be at this lake every day I could in the winter, even if there was a snow storm. I got uncountable bruises, a couple concussions, and a few cases of frostbite, but it was worth it in the end.
          I am very thankful for this lake, and even more thankful for my mom who supported me through the years.
-Miss Sally

   
May 7, 2018
          The ice has just gone out from the lake. The sun shines its bright light happily after the long winter months. The lake, free from its icy bonds, reflects the glorious blue color from the sky.
          That’s what we observed out on the lake today when we went fishing for the first time this year. The lake and the sky seemed so happy and in harmony with each other today. The fish were awake from the cold season, and we caught many of them. We caught a bass so large, we are going to bring it to the taxidermist so we can hang it on the wall! We like this lake very much, and will be fishing in it for the rest of the summer.
-The Peterson Family

July 16, 2018
          Have you ever noticed how the water makes a rainbow when the sun beams collide with its showery mist? Have you ever looked at the water's surface and seen how the sunlight shines off it, how bright it can be?
          When we were out in our motorboat today, we saw these things as we zoomed along the surface of the water, splashing sheets in a V shape behind us. This lake is very large and open with beautiful scenery. It is the perfect lake for boating on, and we'll be doing that again soon!
-The Tyler Family

August 3, 2018
          Today we were at the lake swimming. It was a cool, refreshing break in the roasting summer day. Today we thought the disturbances in the water were very cool and interesting; how big or little they could be. When you waded in, little ripples would float away from you in close rings. When you jumped off one of the docks into the water, there would be a large splash, and then the water would flow away from you in bigger, more separated rings. We love this lake and will continue enjoying it.
-The Colander Family

          



(Assignment for Writing Lesson #4 - Adjectives)



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Saturday, June 2, 2018

The Mystery of Quincy Lake




The Mystery of Quincy Lake
by
Kayla Jones
(age 16)

                Marty set his heavy luggage down and wiped his tan forehead. The dust from the old country road swirled  around his feet as he took in the view of his uncle’s old estate. The small cabin was old-too old perhaps. The shutters shielding the windows were sagging, and flapping in the light summer breeze. The shingles had started falling off and the door was wide open.
               He grabbed his two suitcases loaded with clothes and food, and started walking toward the building. He slowly walked up the three squeaky porch steeps and peered inside the cabin. “Hello?” He said uneasily. A bird flew out of the cabin, jumping Marty enough that he fell backwards.
                “What’s a young man doing out here in the country by yerself? Why, I have a right ta skin ya alive for sneakin’ up on me like that.” A voice of an old man chuckled. “He he, you have some lessons to learn, all right. The lake will teach ya.”
                Marty trembled at the harsh, unfamiliar voice. He stood up and, grabbing his luggage, bolted off the porch into the trees surrounding the place. He ran until he was out of breath. He gasped, while running his hand through his thick blonde hair. “Maybe I should’ve stayed with Ma and Pa. This was a dumb idea, running away.” To his left, he saw something shining through the thick pine trees. Curious, he followed the sparkles into a clearing. A small, pure looking lake lay in front of him.
                “Well,” the boy said, “This must be Quincy lake. I guess I could take a swim before I head home.” He smiled as he undressed. The water looked so clear, so refreshing. Little did he know what was hidden in the sandy bottom.
                He jumped into the water and swam around. “Ahhh” Marty sighed as the cool water soaked his body. He swam a little deeper, so that his feet barely touched the bottom. He tip-toed on the lake floor. Marty stopped when something snagged his big toe. “It doesn’t feel like a rock,” He thought. “It feels…slimy.” The words of the creepy old man living in his uncle’s old place came back to him: “The lake will teach ya.”
                Marty’s blood ran cold. He dipped his head under the water to see what his toe was snagged on. His toe wasn’t snagged at all. Marty screamed, ran out of the water, and dressed as quickly as he could. Leaving his luggage behind, he ran all the way to his home. He was later found in his bedroom, staring out the window, his eyes as smooth as a river stone-clear and empty.
              The old man had watched the boy jump out of the water, yelling and screaming in fear. He laughed and laughed till he began to wheeze. He collected himself and began to sing as he made his way home “Yup, that young whipper snapper learnt’ his less’n. Yes sir! He learnt’ real good!” The creepy man celebrated the rest of the night, because it’s not everyday that a boy learns his lesson.

                

(assignment for lesson #4 - Adjectives)


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(or know someone who likes to write stories)
I would like to post your story here.
Send me an email. I'd love to read your story!

Saturday, May 19, 2018

The Tiny Field Mouse




The Tiny Field Mouse

by 
Xavier Colfer (age 13)
       
        Once there was a field mouse. He had a cozy little burrow under an oak tree, with tiny furniture and a little pantry. This burrow was in a campground with many people in it. There was lots of action and plenty of fun. There was a rec hall, a playground, an office, and a pool.

        One day the field mouse was out on one of his routine food gatherings. He was picking some dandelion greens, when he looked up and saw a hawk! The hawk was swooping down at him with his claws outstretched. The little mouse jumped, dropping his greens, and ran as fast as he could from the hawk. The little mouse was too scared to see where he was going, and without seeing it, he fell into the pool! He splashed into the water, sputtering for breath when he came up.

       The hawk came close to the water but didn't want to get wet. He gave up and flew away, but the mouse wasn't safe yet. The tiny mouse swam around the pool, but couldn't find a way to climb out. He kept searching, but he was getting tired. The tiny mouse kept paddling with everything he had in him.

        The little mouse was losing hope, when some humans got into the pool. They swam around without noticing him, but then they looked over at him. They had seen him! One of the humans paddled over and lifted the little mouse up onto the grass. The tiny mouse had been saved!

        The tiny mouse lay there, exhausted, while the humans came and looked at him. Eventually the little mouse recovered enough to get up. The humans stood there and watched him walk away toward his burrow. When he got there, he dried off and relaxed from the exciting and terrifying day.



(Assignment for lesson #3 of Basic Writing Lessons)


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Saturday, May 5, 2018

Moon Seeker the Mustang Filly





Moon Seeker the Mustang Filly
 by
Kayla Jones
(age 16)

     Against the icy night, the warm, bright sun peaked from under a mountain peak. It rose silently and softly, easing the chilly earth into light and warmth. Under the sun, the dusty colored horse, Desert Streak, lay on the damp grass giving birth. This was her fourth foal, and the experienced mare knew just what to do. Her herd was standing a respectful distance away, keeping guard over Desert Streak. 

The lead stallion, Lion Hide, paced around the herd anxiously. He was worried. Desert Streak in her old age would struggle with this delivery, which would surely be her last. The black stallion was named Lion Hide from his battle with a mountain lion, in which he barely won. The scars from the battle still show on this dark, shiny hide. The stallion neighed, pawed the ground, and trotted around.

     Desert Streak finally gave birth. The mare snorted a sigh of relief, and lay her small head on the grass, catching her breath. Lion Hide came up to her, and nuzzled her face, as if to say Get up, your foal needs you! 

     The mare slowly got to her feet and licked her foal clean. It was a filly. She had a beautiful star on her forehead. Her hide was a bright bay, the perfect combination of her mother’s dusty coat, and her father’s dark one. The filly loved the warmth her mother’s wet tongue as it licked her whole body clean and dry. Desert Streak walked away from her foal and started to graze on some sweet grass nearby. The filly whinnied to her. Where are you going? I want warmth! Desert Streak nickered back: Come to me, little one. Here you will find warm milk.    

     The filly staggered onto her feet and took a step forward. She tumbled down onto the grass. She got up again, and this time stepped forward without falling. She took another couple steps toward her mother and reached her side. The filly nuzzled up to Desert Streak’s flank and nursed. The milk warmed up her system and gave her energy. Desert Streak stood perfectly still as she nursed, occasionally flicking some flies away with her wispy tail.

     After a few hours when the sun was up high in the sky Lion Hide moved the herd higher up the mountain. By now, the little filly was galloping to-and-fro, teasing her older half-siblings, and splashing in a gurgling stream. As the herd continued their climb, Lion Hide walked beside Desert Streak. He wanted to make sure the old mare would make it all the way to the top. They did, and enjoyed a beautiful sunset atop the high meadow. 

     The day became night. The stars twinkled, and the moon started it’s solemn reign in the sky. The filly snorted, and asked her mother, What is that big ball in the sky? Desert Streak neighed back, That is the moon, young one. It rises and falls every night. The filly neighed loudly, I want to see the moon every night! The horses in the herd tossed their heads and pawed the ground in agreement. The old mare then looked down at her bright filly. You shall be called Moon Seeker, little one, for you long to see the moon every night! Moon Seeker neighed and reared, all in joy of belonging, and the excitement of living.



(Assignment for Lesson # 3)


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(or know someone who likes to write stories)
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Saturday, April 14, 2018

"Drip, Drip, Drip"


DRIP, DRIP, DRIP
by
Hannah Aldrich
(age 14)

Drip, drip, drip goes the melting snow
From eaves it drips to the ground below
Through melting ice, grass struggles to show
I love to watch the new gardens grow
The banks they melt, sinking down low
The sun is warmer each day I know,
For drip, drip, drip goes the melting snow

(original and unedited)



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Saturday, April 7, 2018

Broken Watch / Broken Heart



Broken Watch / Broken Heart
by
Kayla Jones
(age 16)



Kathryn woke up from peaceful sleep. Smoke! Her house was on fire! She jumped out of bed, and raced toward the bedroom door. She flung it open, and was devoured by smoke. She coughed and wheezed as she crawled to the porch door. The smoke was so thick, and the fire so hot, she didn’t even know she crawled outside. Her young body tumbled down the porch steps.

     Firetrucks roared by Kathryn as she stood a ways from her house, along with a police officer. The fire chief, after bellowing out orders to the brave firemen, walked briskly toward her. Kathryn grabbed his arm, and sobbed, “Please get my parents out! Please! You just have to!”

     “We’re doing all we can, miss.” The grey-headed chief replied. Kathryn nodded her small head at his reply, and wiped the tears away from her ocean blue eyes. The wind was howling, making her sandy brown hair whip into her charred face.  Kathryn grimaced when she saw the flames of the house flourish.

     As the firemen fought to control the blaze, an object smashed through an upstairs window. It landed on the road with a bang. Kathryn was about to retrieve the object, but another firetruck zoomed by, running over the unknown thing. After checking the road was clear, she raced onto the pavement, and scooped up the object. It was a watch-not just any watch, but her mothers. The glass face was shattered, and the metal black by the flames. It still ticked, but the hands were broken. She lifted the watch closer to her, and wept. Behind her, the house collapsed, without her parents finding a way out.

     The officer kindly gave her a ride to her grandparents, who lived fairly close by. On the ride, Kathryn tightly grasped the broken watch and made sure every shattered piece of glass was still there. When they arrived at her grandparents, she ran toward them and embraced them with helpless sobs. 

     Kathryn’s grandparents thanked the officer, and brought her inside their house. The grandparents sat her by the toasty fire, and made her some hot chocolate. After Kathryn downed the warm drink, she crawled into her grandpa’s lap, and fell asleep.
  
     Kathryn dreamed about her father and mother that night. She saw her mother’s warm smile, and her father’s cheerful laugh. She also dreamed about the watch she still held-the watch that’s been in her family for generations. Somehow, it landed on the road. She dreamed her mother threw it to her from Heaven as a parting gift. “The watch ticks to the beat of your great-great grandmother’s heart” her mother said, “and now it beats to mine.”
     
     Days passed, and the time for her parents funeral was at hand. She endured the whole thing without shedding a tear or losing composure. She grasped the broken watch the entire time. 

     After the funeral, the grandparents took her for some ice cream at the local diner. She swirled the ice cream with her spoon until it was sloppy.

     “Honey bunch, what’s wrong?” The grandfather asked. “It’s your mothers watch, isn’t it? You want it to be fixed, don’t you?

     The grandmother gasped in recognition. “That was my mother’s watch, and her grandmother’s too, I believe. Oh heavens, I’m so relieved you have it. We must get it fixed right away!”

The girl looked up from her melted dairy treat. “I want it to stay broken.” The girl said in an even tone. 

Surprised, the grandmother asked “Why ever so?”

    “Because this watch is like me...broken. I’ll never be the same. We may be able to polish the watch, and glue the glass back together, but the hands will remain broken. It can never be truly fixed, not after what happened.”

     The girls grandma looked her in the eyes. “Girly, we can’t always control what happens to us. Sometimes, bad things come our way, and leave us shattered and broken. And you’re right, we can polish ourselves and fix our appearance after a disaster, but we can never heal our shattered hearts on our own. We need Someone stronger and smarter then ourselves to fix us up. His name is Jesus, and He can heal all our pain. Just like a watch maker can fix up this watch, so can He fix us up. It won’t be easy, and it won’t be quick, but after the healing’s done, the brokenness mended, we will become stronger, and your watch will too.”

     The girl, with tears streaming down her eyes, hugged her grandma. “Thank you, Grandma, I want my watch to be mended, and…and I want to be mended too.” 


So, after another round of ice cream, the trio headed off to send the broken watch to a repairman, and their hearts to the Healer.



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(or know someone who likes to write stories)
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Saturday, March 24, 2018

The Bad Cook




The Bad Cook
by 
Xavier Colfer 
(age 13)

There once was a man who wanted to be a cook. His name was Arnold. He woke up Monday morning and drove in his maroon car into town. When he got to his favorite restaurant, he asked the manager if he could work there. Arnold and the manager were good friends, so the manager told Arnold to come back tomorrow to demonstrate his cooking abilities.

The next morning Arnold drove back to the restaurant. When he got in the kitchen, with the manager watching him, he started to put on the white apron.

"No, you're putting it on backwards!" the manager exclaimed.
"Oh," Arnold said. "I thought you would wear it like a cape."

The manager handed him a chef's hat. When Arnold started to put the hat on upside-down the manager remarked, "Don't do that, you're putting it on upside down!"

"Am I?" Arnold asked. "I thought you used it to carry utensils," he smiled embarrassedly.

After Arnold had fixed the apron and hat, the manager told him, "Why don't you try to make something.* I'll come back in a little while."

When the manager returned, Arnold was surrounded by smoke, and there was an awful burnt smell in the air. There was a loud sizzling, and he was flipping something black and shriveled in a pan.

"What are you cooking?" the manager coughed, waving a hand in front of his face.

"Why, it's an omelet!" Arnold exclaimed, eyes watering from the smoke.

When Arnold and the manager walked back out front, the manager said sadly, "I'm sorry but I can't give you a job here right now. Why don't you try improving your skills and come back another time?"

Arnold went around to many other restaurants looking for a job. Each time he did something wrong and didn't get hired. One time he even tried to impress the manager of another restaurant by rolling around on a ball to get places faster. Of course, he messed that up and ran into a waiter and his cart of food. A week later he returned to the first restaurant.

Arnold asked the manager, "I really need a job, are you sure you don't have anything for me?"

"Well, I don't have a cooking job for you, but my customers have been requesting something…."

That night during the restaurant’s dinner schedule, Arnold was up on a stage in the dining area juggling, rolling on a ball, and doing other entertaining tricks for the diners! Some laughed joyfully, and others smiled amusedly.

Arnold may have been an awful cook, but he had become a great circus entertainer.






If you are between the ages of 13 -18,
(or know someone who likes to write stories)
I would like to post your story here.
Send me an email. I'd love to read your story!

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